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Research Article |

Effect of Intra Row Spacing and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates on Growth Performance of Hot Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) at Wolkite University, Central Ethiopia

Hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is one of the most important and economical vegetable crop produced in Ethiopia including Gurage zone. Use of appropriate plant spacing’s and optimum nitrogen application are the major agronomic practice to improve the productivity of hot pepper. However, the productivity of hot pepper is low its potential due to many factors such as poor soil fertility, under or above optimum plant population, inappropriate fertilizer application with blanket application in all soil type and crop varieties. Therefore, this experiment was conducted at Wolkite University, College of Agriculture and Natural Resource Demonstration site with the objectives of determining the optimum level of N fertilizer and intra-row spacing for better growth of hot pepper. The experiment consisted of three levels of nitrogen (N1 (75 kg/ha), N2 (100 kg/ha), N3 (125 kg/ha)) and two levels of intra-row spacing (S1 (70×25cm) and S2 (70×30cm)). The inter row spacing was maintained as 70cm. The experiment was laid out in 3×2 factorial arrangement in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) and replicated three times. The analysis of variance revealed that the main effects of intra row spacing and nitrogen rates as well as the interaction of the two factors had a significant effect in all tested growth parameters of hot pepper. The main effect of nitrogen resulted maximum plant height (49.92cm), leaf number per plant (35.45), and number of branch per plant (10.92) which were recorded by the application of 125kg/ha nitrogen. Likewise, the main effect of intra row spacing gave maximum plant height (49.52cm) at 25cm plant spacing, and leaf number per plant (35.30), and number of branch per plant (11.21) from 30cm plant spacing. For interaction effect, the highest plant height (52.00cm) were recorded from S1N3 (25cm plant spacing and 125kg/ha N), whereas the maximum leaf number per plant (38.83) and number of branch per plant (12.67) were obtained from S2N2 (30cm plant spacing and 100kg/ha N fertilizer). Mostly, leaf number and number of branch positively correlated with yield of the crops where the branch increased fruit setting become increased as a result yield increased. Therefore, applying 100 kg/ha N with 70×30 cm plant spacing can be advisable for hot pepper production.

Intra Row Spacing, N Fertilizer, Growth Performance and Hot Pepper

APA Style

Legese, D. G. (2024). Effect of Intra Row Spacing and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates on Growth Performance of Hot Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) at Wolkite University, Central Ethiopia. Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, 13(1), 8-12. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.aff.20241301.12

ACS Style

Legese, D. G. Effect of Intra Row Spacing and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates on Growth Performance of Hot Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) at Wolkite University, Central Ethiopia. Agric. For. Fish. 2024, 13(1), 8-12. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20241301.12

AMA Style

Legese DG. Effect of Intra Row Spacing and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates on Growth Performance of Hot Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) at Wolkite University, Central Ethiopia. Agric For Fish. 2024;13(1):8-12. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20241301.12

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This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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