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Research Article |

Evaluation on Growth Performance of Moringa Stenopetala Provenance at Daro Lebu and Hawi Gudina Districts, West Hararghe Zone, Oromia, East Ethiopia

Six Moringa stenopetala provenances (Abay Filklik, Arbaminch, Gofa, Wolayita, Konso and Babile) were examined for survival and growth parameters at Daro Lebu and Hawi Gudina districts since 2019. This study was undertaken with randomized complete block design with four replications. At age of three year; survival rate, tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH), root collar diameter, canopy diameter (CD) and fresh leaf biomass were assessed. The result indicated that at Daro Lebu, there were significance (P < 0.05) among provenances; in their survival rate, height, root collar diameter, and fresh leaf biomass, but DBH and canopy diameter did not show statistical difference. Survival rate showed significant difference between provenances at Daro Lebu; while at Hawi Gudina site there was no significant difference. Survival rate at Daro Lebu ranged from 50% for M.Gofa and M.wolayita while, M.babile was 83.33%. At Hawi Gudina site survival rate was 91.67% for M.abay Filiklik and 100% for M.konso, M.arbaminch and M.wolayita. All provenances in both sites except M.gofa, M.gofa and M.konso at Daro Lebu had survival rate above 66%. At Daro Lebu, M.abay Filiklik demonstrated superior mean height (2.53 m) followed by M.babile (2.09 m) and M.wolayita (1.2 m) is the shortest provenance. At Hawi Gudina site, M.arbami demonstrated superior mean height (2.32m) followed by M.konso (2.3 m) and M. babile (1.57 m) were the shortest provenance. M.gofa demonstrated superior RCD (99.17 mm) followed by M.babile (98 mm), while M.wolayita (61.09 mm) shown the lowest performance at Daro Lebu. While, at Hawi Gudina site site, M.arbaminch demonstrated superior RCD (138.67mm) followed by M.konso (135.42 mm); while M.babile (107.09 mm) shown the lowest performance. At Daro Lebu, M.babile demonstrated superior fresh leaf biomass (1.61 kg) followed by M.gofa (1.59), while M.wolayita (0.48 kg) shown the lowest performance. At Hawi Gudina site, M.gofa demonstrated superior fresh leaf biomass (3.11 kg) followed by Wolayita (2.91 kg), while M.babile (1.34 kg) shown the lowest performance. Owing to superior growth performances attained, M.babile, M.gofa and M.konso be recommended for Daro Lebu and similar agro-ecology, while M.arbaminch, M.gofa and M.konso for Hawi Gudina and similar agro-ecology.

Daro Lebu, Fresh Leaf Biomass, Growth Performance, Hawi Gudina, Moringa Provenance, Survival Rate

APA Style

Dekeba, S., Diriba, A., Gizaw, W., Mezgebu, M. (2024). Evaluation on Growth Performance of Moringa Stenopetala Provenance at Daro Lebu and Hawi Gudina Districts, West Hararghe Zone, Oromia, East Ethiopia. Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, 13(1), 1-7. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.aff.20241301.11

ACS Style

Dekeba, S.; Diriba, A.; Gizaw, W.; Mezgebu, M. Evaluation on Growth Performance of Moringa Stenopetala Provenance at Daro Lebu and Hawi Gudina Districts, West Hararghe Zone, Oromia, East Ethiopia. Agric. For. Fish. 2024, 13(1), 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20241301.11

AMA Style

Dekeba S, Diriba A, Gizaw W, Mezgebu M. Evaluation on Growth Performance of Moringa Stenopetala Provenance at Daro Lebu and Hawi Gudina Districts, West Hararghe Zone, Oromia, East Ethiopia. Agric For Fish. 2024;13(1):1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20241301.11

Copyright © 2024 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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