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Effect of Intercropping by Flax, Radish and Fenugreek on Faba Bean, Vicia faba L., Production and Reduction of Orobanche crenata Forsk Seed Bank

Received: 15 February 2024    Accepted: 13 March 2024    Published: 2 April 2024
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Abstract

Faba bean Vicia faba L. is a primary source of protein in the diet of masses in Egypt. Broom-rape, Orobanche crenata Forsk (Orobanchaceae), present great threat parasitic weed to some crops in Egypt including faba bean. Egyptian farmers were forced to abandon growing faba bean crops due to O. crenata heavy soil infestation. Several methods have been used for controlling this parasite, but without obvious success. Many researches have shown that intercropping has been more effective than monocropping in suppression of parasitic weeds. The effect of intercropping (fenugreek, radish and flax) using two resistant cultivars (Giza 843& Misr 3) on the emergence of the broomrape spikes and faba bean production were carried out. Intercropping flax or fenugreek among faba bean cultivars, caused a significant reduction in the infestation levels of O. crenata and increased the faba bean yield compared with sole treatments. Flax was more effective in the reducing infestation rate by O. crenata than fenugreek. This reduction appeared to be related to reduced seed germination which may have been as a result of allelochemicals released by fenugreek roots, though this was not confirmed in this study. The reduction in weed infestation was more pronounced in Giza 843, than in Misr 3. Flax treatment showed the lowest weed infestation compared with other intercropping treatments. Fenugreek intercropping treatment resulted in the highest pod yield for both Giza 843 and Misr 3. Using resistant cultivars intercropping with fenugreek or flax is very promising trend that generally combines both good yield and low number of emerged spikes that reduce broomrape seed bank in the infected soils, with variations depending on the cultivar and growing season.

Published in Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (Volume 13, Issue 2)
DOI 10.11648/j.aff.20241302.15
Page(s) 52-59
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Resistance Faba Bean Cultivars, Intercropping, Broomrape Infestation, Seed Bank

References
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Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Hegazi, E., Zeid, A., Attia, M. A., Hasaneen, M. A. E., Shall, A. A., et al. (2024). Effect of Intercropping by Flax, Radish and Fenugreek on Faba Bean, Vicia faba L., Production and Reduction of Orobanche crenata Forsk Seed Bank . Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, 13(2), 52-59. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.aff.20241302.15

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    ACS Style

    Hegazi, E.; Zeid, A.; Attia, M. A.; Hasaneen, M. A. E.; Shall, A. A., et al. Effect of Intercropping by Flax, Radish and Fenugreek on Faba Bean, Vicia faba L., Production and Reduction of Orobanche crenata Forsk Seed Bank . Agric. For. Fish. 2024, 13(2), 52-59. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20241302.15

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    AMA Style

    Hegazi E, Zeid A, Attia MA, Hasaneen MAE, Shall AA, et al. Effect of Intercropping by Flax, Radish and Fenugreek on Faba Bean, Vicia faba L., Production and Reduction of Orobanche crenata Forsk Seed Bank . Agric For Fish. 2024;13(2):52-59. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20241302.15

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  • @article{10.11648/j.aff.20241302.15,
      author = {Esmat Hegazi and Abou Zeid and Manal Ahmed Attia and Mervat Abo Elhamed Hasaneen and Amany Abu Shall and Mohamed Awad El Eryan and Nagat Mohamed Aly and Sania Fateh Allah Showiel and Safaa Moustafa Abd El-Rahman and Hamdy Kotb Abou Taleb and Anter Kenawy Mahmoud and Wedad Emam Khafagi and Marwa Ahmed Farag},
      title = {Effect of Intercropping by Flax, Radish and Fenugreek on Faba Bean, Vicia faba L., Production and Reduction of Orobanche crenata Forsk Seed Bank
    },
      journal = {Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries},
      volume = {13},
      number = {2},
      pages = {52-59},
      doi = {10.11648/j.aff.20241302.15},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.aff.20241302.15},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.aff.20241302.15},
      abstract = {Faba bean Vicia faba L. is a primary source of protein in the diet of masses in Egypt. Broom-rape, Orobanche crenata Forsk (Orobanchaceae), present great threat parasitic weed to some crops in Egypt including faba bean. Egyptian farmers were forced to abandon growing faba bean crops due to O. crenata heavy soil infestation. Several methods have been used for controlling this parasite, but without obvious success. Many researches have shown that intercropping has been more effective than monocropping in suppression of parasitic weeds. The effect of intercropping (fenugreek, radish and flax) using two resistant cultivars (Giza 843& Misr 3) on the emergence of the broomrape spikes and faba bean production were carried out. Intercropping flax or fenugreek among faba bean cultivars, caused a significant reduction in the infestation levels of O. crenata and increased the faba bean yield compared with sole treatments. Flax was more effective in the reducing infestation rate by O. crenata than fenugreek. This reduction appeared to be related to reduced seed germination which may have been as a result of allelochemicals released by fenugreek roots, though this was not confirmed in this study. The reduction in weed infestation was more pronounced in Giza 843, than in Misr 3. Flax treatment showed the lowest weed infestation compared with other intercropping treatments. Fenugreek intercropping treatment resulted in the highest pod yield for both Giza 843 and Misr 3. Using resistant cultivars intercropping with fenugreek or flax is very promising trend that generally combines both good yield and low number of emerged spikes that reduce broomrape seed bank in the infected soils, with variations depending on the cultivar and growing season.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Effect of Intercropping by Flax, Radish and Fenugreek on Faba Bean, Vicia faba L., Production and Reduction of Orobanche crenata Forsk Seed Bank
    
    AU  - Esmat Hegazi
    AU  - Abou Zeid
    AU  - Manal Ahmed Attia
    AU  - Mervat Abo Elhamed Hasaneen
    AU  - Amany Abu Shall
    AU  - Mohamed Awad El Eryan
    AU  - Nagat Mohamed Aly
    AU  - Sania Fateh Allah Showiel
    AU  - Safaa Moustafa Abd El-Rahman
    AU  - Hamdy Kotb Abou Taleb
    AU  - Anter Kenawy Mahmoud
    AU  - Wedad Emam Khafagi
    AU  - Marwa Ahmed Farag
    Y1  - 2024/04/02
    PY  - 2024
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.aff.20241302.15
    DO  - 10.11648/j.aff.20241302.15
    T2  - Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
    JF  - Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
    JO  - Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
    SP  - 52
    EP  - 59
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2328-5648
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.aff.20241302.15
    AB  - Faba bean Vicia faba L. is a primary source of protein in the diet of masses in Egypt. Broom-rape, Orobanche crenata Forsk (Orobanchaceae), present great threat parasitic weed to some crops in Egypt including faba bean. Egyptian farmers were forced to abandon growing faba bean crops due to O. crenata heavy soil infestation. Several methods have been used for controlling this parasite, but without obvious success. Many researches have shown that intercropping has been more effective than monocropping in suppression of parasitic weeds. The effect of intercropping (fenugreek, radish and flax) using two resistant cultivars (Giza 843& Misr 3) on the emergence of the broomrape spikes and faba bean production were carried out. Intercropping flax or fenugreek among faba bean cultivars, caused a significant reduction in the infestation levels of O. crenata and increased the faba bean yield compared with sole treatments. Flax was more effective in the reducing infestation rate by O. crenata than fenugreek. This reduction appeared to be related to reduced seed germination which may have been as a result of allelochemicals released by fenugreek roots, though this was not confirmed in this study. The reduction in weed infestation was more pronounced in Giza 843, than in Misr 3. Flax treatment showed the lowest weed infestation compared with other intercropping treatments. Fenugreek intercropping treatment resulted in the highest pod yield for both Giza 843 and Misr 3. Using resistant cultivars intercropping with fenugreek or flax is very promising trend that generally combines both good yield and low number of emerged spikes that reduce broomrape seed bank in the infected soils, with variations depending on the cultivar and growing season.
    
    VL  - 13
    IS  - 2
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Faculty of Agriculture, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt

  • Food Legumes Research Department, Agricultural Research Center (ARC), Cairo, Egypt

  • Bioassay Research Department, Central Agricultural Pesticide Laboratory (CAPL), Agricultural Research Center (ARC), Giza, Egypt

  • Plant Protection Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center (ARC), Research Center (ARC), Alexandria, Egypt

  • Faculty of Agriculture, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt

  • Faculty of Agriculture, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt

  • Mammalian Toxicology Department, Central Agricultural Pesticide Laboratory (CAPL), Agricultural Research Center (ARC), Alexandria, Egypt

  • Plant Protection Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center (ARC), Research Center (ARC), Alexandria, Egypt

  • Bioassay Research Department, Central Agricultural Pesticide Laboratory (CAPL), Agricultural Research Center (ARC), Giza, Egypt

  • Plant Protection Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center (ARC), Research Center (ARC), Alexandria, Egypt

  • Mammalian Toxicology Department, Central Agricultural Pesticide Laboratory (CAPL), Agricultural Research Center (ARC), Alexandria, Egypt

  • Plant Protection Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center (ARC), Research Center (ARC), Alexandria, Egypt

  • Marwa A. Farag Economic Entomology and Pesticide Department, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

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