Review Article | | Peer-Reviewed

The Connection Between the High Frequency Data and Schizophrenia

Received: 27 January 2024    Accepted: 8 February 2024    Published: 2 April 2024
Views:       Downloads:
Abstract

Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that affects millions of people around the world. While the exact causes of schizophrenia are still not fully understood, recent research has suggested that the brain's frequency filter may play a role in its development. The brain's frequency filter helps us process and interpret the sensory information we receive. It allows us to focus on what is important while filtering out unnecessary or irrelevant information. The exact cause of schizophernia is not known but believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and brain chemical/neurotransmitter factors. Risk factors include family history, certain gene variants, pregnancy/birth complications, drug use, and stress. For individuals with schizophrenia, this filtering process may not function properly, leading to cognitive impairments and the manifestation of symptoms. In summary, schizophrenia is a serious but treatable mental health condition with both biological and socio-environmental contributors. A combination of medication, therapy, social support, and self-help strategies are important for management. Diagnosis is based on the pattern and severity of symptoms. No single test can diagnose it. Doctors also check to rule out other possible causes. Without treatment, schizophrenia can severely disrupt daily functioning and carry increased risks like heavy smoking, suicide, homelessness, poverty, and self-neglect. Support via therapy and rehabilitation can help manage these issues.

Published in American Journal of BioScience (Volume 12, Issue 2)
DOI 10.11648/j.ajbio.20241202.11
Page(s) 35-39
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Schizophernia, LPF, High Frequency

References
[1] “The high frequency voices and schizophernia”. Available from:
[2] Heffner, H. E., & Heffner, R. S. (2008). High-frequency hearing. In P. Dallos, D. Oertel & R. Hoy (Eds.), Handbook of the senses: Audition (pp. 55–60). Elsevier NY.
[3] Hosey, G., & Druck, P. L. (1987). The influence of zoo visitors on the behaviour of captive primates. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 18, 19–29.
[4] Kight, C. R., & Swaddle, J. P. (2011). How and why environmental noise impacts animals: An integrative, mechanistic review. Ecology Letters, 14, 1052–1061.
[5] Larsen, M. J., Sherwen, S. L., & Rault, J. L. (2014). Number of nearby visitors and noise level affect vigilance in captive koalas. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 154, 76–82.
[6] Leighton, T. G. (2007). What is ultrasound? Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology, 93, 3–83.
[7] Long, M. (2014). Architectural acoustics. 2nd ed. Waltham: Elsevier.
[8] McKenna, M. F., Shannon, G., & Fristrup, K. (2016). Characterizing anthropogenic noise to improve understanding and management of impacts to wildlife. Endangered Species Research, 31, 279–291.
[9] Milligan, S. R., Sales, G. D., & Khirnykh, K. (1993). Sound levels in rooms housing laboratory animals: An uncontrolled daily variable. Physiology and Behavior, 53, 1067–1076.
[10] Morgan, K. N., & Tromborg, C. T. (2007). Sources of stress in captivity.
[11] Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 102, 262–302.
[12] National Institute of Health Consensus Report. (1990). Consensus conference. Noise and hearing loss. Journal of the American Medical Association, 263(23), 3185–3190.
[13] National Research Council. (2011). Guide for the care and use of laboratory animals (8th ed.). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
[14] Orban, D. A., Soltis, J., Perkins, L., & Mellen, J. D. (2017). Sound at the zoo: Using animal monitoring, sound measurement, and noise reduction in zoo animal management. Zoo Biology, 36, 231–236.
[15] “The schizophernia”. Available from:
Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Dashtban, G., Nourmandipour, P. (2024). The Connection Between the High Frequency Data and Schizophrenia . American Journal of BioScience, 12(2), 35-39. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajbio.20241202.11

    Copy | Download

    ACS Style

    Dashtban, G.; Nourmandipour, P. The Connection Between the High Frequency Data and Schizophrenia . Am. J. BioScience 2024, 12(2), 35-39. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbio.20241202.11

    Copy | Download

    AMA Style

    Dashtban G, Nourmandipour P. The Connection Between the High Frequency Data and Schizophrenia . Am J BioScience. 2024;12(2):35-39. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbio.20241202.11

    Copy | Download

  • @article{10.11648/j.ajbio.20241202.11,
      author = {Gandom Dashtban and Parham Nourmandipour},
      title = {The Connection Between the High Frequency Data and Schizophrenia
    },
      journal = {American Journal of BioScience},
      volume = {12},
      number = {2},
      pages = {35-39},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ajbio.20241202.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajbio.20241202.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ajbio.20241202.11},
      abstract = {Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that affects millions of people around the world. While the exact causes of schizophrenia are still not fully understood, recent research has suggested that the brain's frequency filter may play a role in its development. The brain's frequency filter helps us process and interpret the sensory information we receive. It allows us to focus on what is important while filtering out unnecessary or irrelevant information. The exact cause of schizophernia is not known but believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and brain chemical/neurotransmitter factors. Risk factors include family history, certain gene variants, pregnancy/birth complications, drug use, and stress. For individuals with schizophrenia, this filtering process may not function properly, leading to cognitive impairments and the manifestation of symptoms. In summary, schizophrenia is a serious but treatable mental health condition with both biological and socio-environmental contributors. A combination of medication, therapy, social support, and self-help strategies are important for management. Diagnosis is based on the pattern and severity of symptoms. No single test can diagnose it. Doctors also check to rule out other possible causes. Without treatment, schizophrenia can severely disrupt daily functioning and carry increased risks like heavy smoking, suicide, homelessness, poverty, and self-neglect. Support via therapy and rehabilitation can help manage these issues.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

    Copy | Download

  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - The Connection Between the High Frequency Data and Schizophrenia
    
    AU  - Gandom Dashtban
    AU  - Parham Nourmandipour
    Y1  - 2024/04/02
    PY  - 2024
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajbio.20241202.11
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ajbio.20241202.11
    T2  - American Journal of BioScience
    JF  - American Journal of BioScience
    JO  - American Journal of BioScience
    SP  - 35
    EP  - 39
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2330-0167
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajbio.20241202.11
    AB  - Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that affects millions of people around the world. While the exact causes of schizophrenia are still not fully understood, recent research has suggested that the brain's frequency filter may play a role in its development. The brain's frequency filter helps us process and interpret the sensory information we receive. It allows us to focus on what is important while filtering out unnecessary or irrelevant information. The exact cause of schizophernia is not known but believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and brain chemical/neurotransmitter factors. Risk factors include family history, certain gene variants, pregnancy/birth complications, drug use, and stress. For individuals with schizophrenia, this filtering process may not function properly, leading to cognitive impairments and the manifestation of symptoms. In summary, schizophrenia is a serious but treatable mental health condition with both biological and socio-environmental contributors. A combination of medication, therapy, social support, and self-help strategies are important for management. Diagnosis is based on the pattern and severity of symptoms. No single test can diagnose it. Doctors also check to rule out other possible causes. Without treatment, schizophrenia can severely disrupt daily functioning and carry increased risks like heavy smoking, suicide, homelessness, poverty, and self-neglect. Support via therapy and rehabilitation can help manage these issues.
    
    VL  - 12
    IS  - 2
    ER  - 

    Copy | Download

Author Information
  • Sections